The Horse Valse - Patch Sketch Series

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Your patches sound real good! Great examples of how powerful VCV Rack is!

I watch them all on your Youtube channel.

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Thank you, Schabbes! Your words means a lot to me! I did check out your awesome channel, I reckon there is a lot for me to learn before I can get where you are. At least I have something to aim for! :smile:

Oh thanks! :slight_smile: I’m flattered, but I don’t think there’s much of a difference in skill between us, I usually keep it simple, just like to add MIDI mapping and wiggle some knobs.

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Amazing. All your patches are so good. Inspiring and instructional. I find it’s VERY easy to get a muddy mix once I get above half a dozen different sounds playing. The clean, well-balanced sound of your patches is particularly impressive. Thanks for sharing!

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Thanks, cosmoproductions! :slight_smile:

I still learn every day, and I have been found guilty of over eq and cut everything. I try to achieve a clean mix most of the time. A lot of music consists of 4-5 elements, at least I try to consolidate all tracks under these categories and try to find a space for them in the mix: drums, bass, leads (arp), pad, (support) fx… Drums and bass can clash easily at the bottom end (need to decide what will be prominent, then cut or sidechain to taste), leads and pads occupy the upper part of the spectrum (they can clash too). You can layer 3 leads, as long as they support each other, and you cut the unwanted (duplicated) elements away and make them sound like one unit. (No need for 2 pads 2 leads and an arp heavy on the same range, you need to cut or pan something, or sidechain…) I usually find it useful to cut some of the upper bass or low mid around 3-500hz also around 7-900hz. Helps in clarity in certain music styles and clears up muddiness. Of course, you could always dynamic eq, or make a dynamic mix and automate the eq so when the instruments are not crowded you can bring the frequencies back, but 1.I am too lazy, 2. Not enough CPU power, 3. I did not quite learn the craft yet, 4. This was meant to be a quick afternoon fun, I do not take it too seriously. (If I do, I never finish anything, or just stop because it is too bad. This is a lighthearted practice, learning a habit to make beats regardless of quality, sharing my experience with others because we can learn from each other’s mistakes and success)It is easier to think that less is more, and not use 2 similar things at the same time. Once I mastered this approach, then I will try to make massive projects with 100 tracks. Until then, I try to turn quantity into quality. (If it ever happens)

By the way, I did check out your band camp, I can not find one muddy recording! All pristine! I wish I could create just one full track, let alone a whole album, or 2! I guess we all should have goals to aim for… :smiley:

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Thanks for checking it all out! Yeah it’s a challenge to push artwork that last bit to where it’s something complete. In visual effects production we say an 80/20 principle generally applies; the first 80% of the work takes 20% of the time, and the last 20% takes 80% of the time. That seems approximately true with making music too. For me, tweaking and polishing to final takes at least as much time as laying down the initial ideas of the patch, often much more. One thing I find helpful is setting some kind of deadline for finishing the tracks. Doesn’t really matter what it is as long it motivates me to finish the work by a particular date.

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