Aria Salvatrice Signature Series 1.2.0: Darius Branching Step Sequencer

Hiya hi hello hey! I’ve started making a few little cool and nice modules for VCV Rack, entitled the Aria Salvatrice Signature Series. Not very fancy yet, but I hope you will like them.


Version 1.1.0: The Split & Merge Series

A collection of tiny cute polyphonic splits and merges, with a neato trick: they can sort channels by voltage! It’s meant for neat freaks who want their values in order, and for the advancement of science in general. I did not make them because a use case exists. I made them because I want to see what kinds of use cases you will come up with.

A complimentary Signature Series 8hp Blank Plate and :heart:-head screwdriver are provided with every Signature Series module purchase.


Version 1.2.0: Darius Branching Step Sequencer

Are you still looking for the perfect sequencer, the one that allows you to effortlessly express any musical idea?

Sucks.

Here comes yet another gimmick module challenging you to integrate its bizarre ideas to your song instead.

Darius is a 8-step sequencer where each node branches into two possible paths, creating repeating patterns that start similarly and resolve differently. Takes a whole 32hp of space to fit all its knobs.

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So, I’m still a complete beginner at C++, and I thought the best way to get started figuring out module development would be to reimplement something that exists, in a way that’d still provide value to users, so I thought about making a module that included both a split and a merge, in a space-efficient form factor.

From there, I tried to figure out how to make the module more useful, and I thought, how about sorting the values by voltage? It turns out that if you feed it four different oscillators in sort mode, you end up creating very interesting hybrid waveforms. I’ve just scratched the surface of potential applications.

I decided to make a whole series of variations on this basic idea, and that series seems complete now.

Despite the modules not being particularly original, I tried to give them a lot of polish. Trying to get the design look good right from the start should help me make more modules with a consistent look.
I also entirely stole the idea of having illuminated jacks with a translucent ring from @stoermelder.

I have plans for more modules eventually, no schedule however, I work on them when I wanna.

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Congrats on the release Aria :smile: Btw ? are you french too? :open_mouth:

I love the Blank one, the drawing is so cute ! :heart:

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“I did not make them because a use case exists. I made them because I want to see what kinds of use cases you will come up with.”

I love this philosophy on design and am going to totally rip it off

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Yup, aren’t pretty much half of us French at this point?

Also, I added a Windows build of 1.1.0 to the OP for people who want to play with it immediately.

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Haha oui je me demande :joy:

Cool :smile: Will try them ^^

Cool Breeze

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Love the panels!

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This. More of.

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1.1.0 available from the library now! Give a try to sort mode and see what you can come up with :smiley:

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I’ve been feeding a sorted chord to a sequential switch to make arpeggios. It’s brilliant for that.

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Heyos! Finished a new little module: Darius Branching Step Sequencer

It’s been submitted to the library. Here’s a Windows build if you wanna try it out now.

And here’s the doc/marketing blurb:


Are you still looking for the perfect sequencer, the one that allows you to effortlessly express any musical idea?

Sucks.

Here comes yet another gimmick module challenging you to integrate its bizarre ideas to your song instead.

Darius is a 8-step sequencer where each node branches into two possible paths, creating repeating patterns that start similarly and resolve differently. Takes a whole 32hp of space to fit all its knobs.

To get started, patch in a clock, randomize the CV, and patch the main output.

On each node:

  • CV Knob (left): sets the CV for that step (0V~10V)
  • Random route knob (right): alters the probability to pick the top or the bottom node on the next step. Arrow pointing to the right means 50/50.
  • Output: when active, passes through the clock input (both gates and trigs work), or sends 10V continuously if no step input is plugged in.

You can randomize the CV and the routes separately. If you leave all the Random route knobs to the default, the pattern will naturally end up towards the center most of the time. Use this information wisely, or don’t.

Darius is named after the eponymous arcade shoot-em-up game series, known for its surreal visuals, its fish-themed enemies, its unique soundtracks, its multi-display arcade cabinets, and for allowing the player to select their route through the game via a branching map. For the most authentic experience possible, set the pattern length to 7 and write your song in 7/8 time.

I guess the module is also technically named after some dead Persian guy who did some King stuff, I heard on Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.


Hope you enjoy and manage to get nice songs out of it :smiley:

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looks cool! nice job!

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Just been playing with this, very nice, thank you :slight_smile:

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Little demo of the most basic use case possible with sound:

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Interesting!

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Exciting! Nice work!

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Proper

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I love your panels, don’t mind giving up some screen real estate for a big one. Stoked to try this out once it is available for linux.

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Darius looks amazing (both in form and function). Looking forward to it!

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